without fear

@ryanklindsay does not beware the moors

dshalv:

brianmichaelbendis:

Bill Sienkiewiz: 1986: S.H.I.E.L.D. Logo from the Elektra: Assassin series

As seen in MOON KNIGHT #1, if anyone spotted it.

dshalv:

brianmichaelbendis:

Bill Sienkiewiz: 1986: S.H.I.E.L.D. Logo from the Elektra: Assassin series

As seen in MOON KNIGHT #1, if anyone spotted it.

(Source: comicartistevolution)

brianmichaelbendis:

Marvel House Ads 1978

Bring these back.

Or let’s do some for some Monkeybrain books :)

(Source: transmissionsgeekroom)

mikedeodatojr:

Elektra circa 1997

This is really on point. This looks like Elektra.

mikedeodatojr:

Elektra circa 1997

This is really on point. This looks like Elektra.

seanhowe:

Blade Runner by Jim Steranko


Oof.

seanhowe:

Blade Runner by Jim Steranko

Oof.

(via secretdead)

“Comics are expensive. Don’t make me resent the money I spend buying yours. Every single moment in your script must either move the story along or demonstrate something important about the characters — preferably both — and every panel that does neither is a sloppy waste of space.”

—   Mark Waid (via comicquotations)

(via marvel1980s)

Anonymous said: Yep, exactly what I've expected: The new Captain America is black. We're at a point, where the enforced diversity in comics is straight up insulting. I hardly doubt that even african-americans are happy about these changes at this point. There is no doubt in my head, that you're pissing off more white readers than pleasing black readers with these stupid, stupid, stupid changes. Nick Fury, Spider-Man, an entire Avengers team consisting out of black people and now a black Captain America... Bah.

brevoortformspring:

You do the segregationist movement of the early 20th century credit, sir!

Welcome to 2014.

Wow. “the enforced diversity in comics is straight up insulting" is a quote that makes me shudder. We all know why and how we should be diversifying comics, right? So when it happens we need to start championing those moves, not finding the snarkiest little angles to get worked up about it, or hacking away at it as not being good enough.

Ah, it’s like kicking the tide back out.

udhcmh:

Contents page from Dynamic Science Stories, April-May 1939, featuring a story by the man with the best name in the pulps, Manly Wade Wellman.
Image thanks to The Pulp Magazine Project.

udhcmh:

Contents page from Dynamic Science Stories, April-May 1939, featuring a story by the man with the best name in the pulps, Manly Wade Wellman.

Image thanks to The Pulp Magazine Project.

(via notpulpcovers)

70scomiccovers:

Marvel Premiere 13 featuring Dr. Strange, January 1974


Love that logo dress.

70scomiccovers:

Marvel Premiere 13 featuring Dr. Strange, January 1974

Love that logo dress.

(via 70sscifiart)

PAUL ALLOR ON THE PERILS OF SELF-PUBLISHING

comicssurvivalkit:

Paul Allor wrote one of my favorite recent small press comics, the wonderful ORC GIRL.  Because I know very little about Self-Publishing, I asked friends who have been successful at it for their honest tips, and Paul’s encouraging but sobering words here are absolutely essential. Thanks, Paul!

PAUL (ORC GIRL) ALLOR

Okay, let’s get this out of the way up-front: the subtitle of this post should be “Self-Publishing Advice from a Guy Who’s Lost a Whole Lot of Money Self-Publishing.” If you want to know how to self-publish your comics in an economically viable, financially sustainable way, I’m not your guy. Because frankly, I think that’s nearly impossible, unless you’re an established creator (or a wizard!).

But if you’re looking to self-publish as a way to get your work out there, and start to build a career, then we can talk. I’m going to assume that you already have a script, and the creative team is assembled, and everything is awesome. I’m also assuming that you’re interested in a print comic, not just something web-based. Here are a few (woefully incomplete) thoughts on where you go from there.

Read More

Reread this every time you are about to make your own comics. Ground yourself. Known you have to do it anyway. Enter the battle prepared, armed, and armoured.

A Day Job is Not an Art Crime

colleendoran:

While I don’t want to be the voice of reason that buzzkills your art dreams, the fact is few people can make a full- time living in this business. Fewer still can sustain a long term career in the creative arts.

It’s hard to know when to let something go. Or when to keep pushing through.


Many…

Yep, thinking about retirement is a big thing for me. Unless you get a huuuuge payday, no one is putting superannuation away for you. Think past this year and really map out the career you need to take you to 100 years old.

sandyjarrell:

bigredrobot:

boomerstarkiller67:

Lando Calrissian

He’s not a system, he’s a man.

WILLIAM DECEMBER WILLIAMS

sandyjarrell:

bigredrobot:

boomerstarkiller67:

Lando Calrissian

He’s not a system, he’s a man.

WILLIAM DECEMBER WILLIAMS

spaceshiprocket:

The ABC’s Of Wolverine by Sean Gordon Murphy

I remember seeing this years ago. I think it might’ve been the first Murphy art I ever came across. An interesting way to grab attention and ‘break in’ as it were (though it wasn’t his first stuff or anything, I just mean break in as to bolster the name and get more eyes, etc).

Marvel 99c Digital - Fantasy Editor

Marvel 99c Digital – Fantasy Editor

Sometimes it’s fun to play ‘fantasy comics editor‘ and align creative talent with characters. It’s super lame, I know this, but it’s fun. It’s also a mental game that keeps you thinking and can be done on the side – while doing this I managed to cook up two little story ideas and also get a break on one I’m scripting right now. Any time you are using your brain, that’s good stuff. And for a guy…

View On WordPress

(via chrisvisions)